Echelon Academy International Scholars

COURSE CATALOG

.5 Credits

One Semester

1 Credit

Two Semesters

Required Pathway Course

Public Speaking and Debate

Speech: Study of methods for preparing and presenting public speeches. Consideration of impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, sales speeches, business presentations and other special occasion speeches. Emphasis on performance and evaluation. 

Debate: Study the art of argumentation, debate theory, and rhetorical strategies. Consideration of the primary roles of affirmative and negative speakers, case construction, cross-examination and rebuttals speeches. Emphasis on research analysis, case construction and technical debate skills such as flowing, signposting, and roadmapping. 

1 Credit

Business and Finance Courses

Computer Information Systems (CIS)

An introduction to computer-based information systems. Emphasis is placed on the role of computers in organizations and society, computer hardware and software, uses of information systems, computer ethics, and collaboration using computers. Students will use typical business applications.

.5 Credit

Entrepreneurship

Student entrepreneurs investigate topics such as business opportunities, feasibility studies, development of a business plan, financing alternatives, marketing, and legal forms of organization.

.5 Credit

Micro Economics

Topics covered include supply and demand, consumer choice, economics of the firm and industry, production costs, distribution theory, international trade, comparative economic systems and the philosophy of economics.

.5 Credit

Macro Economics

Behavior of systems at the national and international levels. Topics include the methodology of economics as a social science, supply and demand, definition and measurement of important macroeconomic variables, and theoretical models of growth, inflation, interest rates, unemployment, business cycles, stabilization policy, exchange rates and the balance of payments.

.5 Credit

Intro to Accounting

This course provides students with a more comprehensive study of accounting principles and the application of these principles to a wide range of business situations. Introducing basic business and accounting topics such as revenue, investments, expenditures, liabilities, credit, cash management and taxation.

.5 Credit

Intro to Finance

This course will focus on corporate finance and business management. We will start with a review of accounting and basics of time value of money. Next, we analyze financial statements in order to identify a firm’s strengths and weaknesses. We then move to financial leverage and financial forecasting concepts, as well as theories for managing current assets and current liabilities. The second half of the course will be devoted to advanced time value of money concepts and methods companies use to choose acceptable investment projects. 

.5 Credit

Intro to Management

This course trains students in business administration & management. This course will provide students with an understanding of the basic theories and principles by which businesses are organized and managed in modern society. They will demonstrate competency by analyzing management functions, principles, and processes that contribute to the achievement of organizational goals. Second semester students will understand the elements of a business plan and its effect on the success of small businesses. This course includes classroom instruction and business simulations.

.5 Credit

Intro to Marketing

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the concepts, analyses, and activities that comprise marketing management, and to provide practice in assessing and solving marketing problems. Topics include marketing strategy, customer behavior, segmentation, market research, product management, pricing, promotion, sales force management and competitive analysis.

.5 Credit

Law Courses

United States Government and Politics

Students will utilize inquiry and literacy skills to develop a deep understanding of the foundation and structures of the U.S. government, evaluate the importance of citizen participation, and analyze the impact of principles, laws, people, and organizations on domestic, foreign, and economic policies that affect our daily lives. Throughout the course, students study contemporary public policy issues while deepening their ability to analyze and evaluate sources and respond to document based questions.

1 Credit

Criminal Justice

An introduction to the development of the American criminal justice system from early English beginnings to the present in its three dimensions: police, courts and corrections.

.5 Credit

Business Law

Business Law is a survey of the American legal system designed to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of business law. Classes are conducted by using text and actual case studies for the purpose of observing the development and application of legal principles in a business activity. Topics covered include the nature of law, courts and court procedures, crimes and torts, contracts, sales, and negotiable instruments.

.5 Credit

Environmental Law

In this course, we will look at the major statutes and policies used, at both the federal and state levels, to protect humans and the environment against exposure to harmful substances, including the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Superfund, the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act, and laws designed to regulate toxic substances. This course will also examine the challenges of global air pollution, including climate change and ozone depletion. The course will look not only at the substance of these laws and policies, but also at enforcement challenges, alternative legal mechanisms for advancing environmental policies, the role of market mechanisms in addressing environmental problems, and constitutional restrictions on environmental regulation. Students will engage in a series of situational case studies designed to provide a better sense of the real-world issues faced by environmental lawyers and to teach students the skills and tactics needed to solve those issues.

.5 Credit

Family Law

This course provides students with a general overview of the law governing families, looking at formation and dissolution of marriage, pre-marital contracts, property settlement agreements, grounds and defenses for divorce, the parent child relationship, child support, custody and visitation, domestic violence, equitable distribution of marital or community property on divorce, and the role of the family lawyer.

.5 Credit

Tax Law

This course provides students with a general overview of the law of taxation, with a focus on the taxation of individuals. The course introduces basic concepts that apply to the taxation of businesses as well as to individuals.

.5 Credit

Medicine Courses

Health and First Aid

Students learn factual health information in the following content areas: mental and emotional health; alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs; personal and consumer health; family life and human sexuality; safety and injury prevention; nutrition and fitness; and disease prevention and control. Students develop lifelong health skills such as analyzing influences; accessing information, interpersonal communication skills, decision making, goal setting, self-management; and advocacy for personal, consumer, and family health throughout the course.

.5 Credit

Neuroscience

Neuroscience explores the anatomy and neuroimaging methods for studying the brain as well as the structure and function of neurons. Drug addiction, brain development and mental illness are explored through real life models and the causes and effects of human behavior. This NGSS aligned course asks students to investigate complex questions related to neuroscience and the law while exploring the biological and environmental factors which may increase a person’s risk for criminal behavior. After exploring brain malfunctions, neurological challenges, and psychiatric disorders, students learn about the effects of mental well-being and its dependency and influences on the brain.

1 Credit

Intro to Psychology

Students are introduced to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. While learning how to apply psychological principles to daily life, students investigate the role of scientific inquiry into the major domains of psychology, including Methods of Research, Biopsychology, Cognitive Processes, Lifespan Development, and Sociocultural Dimensions of Behavior.

1 Credit

Organic Chemistry

The preparation, properties, and reactions of the more important classes of carbon compounds are studied in this lecture and laboratory course. Emphasis is on reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and functional group characteristics. The laboratory stresses synthetic methods and techniques. Compounds are analyzed using classical and instrumental methods.

1 Credit

Biochemistry

This course involves the study of the molecular composition of living cells, the organization of biological molecules within the cell, and the structure and function of these biological molecules. The biological macromolecules which this course focuses on are proteins, polysaccharides, and polynucleic acids (DNA and RNA), including the monomeric units of these macromolecules. We will concentrate on the structures of these molecules, their functions, and the strong relationship between structure and function. We will also examine the structure and function of lipids, an important type of biological molecule and a major component of cell membranes. Along with the study of lipids, we will examine biological transport in membranes and the kinetics and catalytic mechanisms of enzymes.

1 Credit

Genetics

In this course, students will learn Mendelian, molecular, and medical genetics. The historical aspects as well as our current understanding of the laws governing inheritance are investigated.

.5 Credit

Anatomy

This course is a study of the major systems of the human body. Career opportunities in medical-related fields are examined. The course is intended for advanced-level students. Anatomy and Physiology A topics include cells, tissues, and systems (skeletal, muscular, integumentary, and nervous). Anatomy and Physiology topics include digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

.5 Credit

STEM Courses

Biochemistry

This course involves the study of the molecular composition of living cells, the organization of biological molecules within the cell, and the structure and function of these biological molecules. The biological macromolecules which this course focuses on are proteins, polysaccharides, and polynucleic acids (DNA and RNA), including the monomeric units of these macromolecules. We will concentrate on the structures of these molecules, their functions, and the strong relationship between structure and function. We will also examine the structure and function of lipids, an important type of biological molecule and a major component of cell membranes. Along with the study of lipids, we will examine biological transport in membranes and the kinetics and catalytic mechanisms of enzymes.

1 Credit

Chemical Engineering

This course explores the introductory principles of chemical engineering. The major topics discussed include material and energy balances, stoichiometry, and thermodynamics.

1 Credit

Computer Coding

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of computer programming, which is the foundation of Computer Science. Students design, write, and debug computer programs.

.5 Credit

Software Engineering

Introduction to software life cycle models. Software requirements, engineering, formal specification and validation. Techniques for software design and testing. Cost estimation models. Issues in software quality assurance and software maintenance.

.5 Credit

Civil Engineering

A broad introductory course that exposes students to topics directly related to civil engineering, such as structural design, forces in structures, civil engineering materials, fluid mechanics, hydraulics and hydrological systems, and geotechnical and environmental engineering. This course also introduces students to the business aspects of the civil engineering profession, including construction management, and engineering economics.

1 Credit

Statistics

First Semester topics include data analysis, probability, simulations, inferential statistics, normal and binomial distributions, techniques of sampling, confidence intervals, and hypotheses testing. Second semester topics are chosen from cryptography and coding, game and graph theory, architecture, trigonometry, fairness and apportionment, careers, investment and finance, and college placement test review.

1 Credit

Global Studies

American History

Students learn key concepts and events through reading, writing, document analysis, and historical thinking. In the first semester, students learn the effects of migration, immigration, and industrialization; the impact of United States involvement in world affairs through World War I; and major developments of the 1920s and 1930s. In the second semester, students learn the impact of World War II; the origins and effects of the Cold War; cultural changes in post-war America including the expansion of civil rights; and foreign and domestic policies between 1968 and 1991.

1 Credit

English 1

English 9 lays the foundation for the detailed analysis and argumentation that is expected of students throughout high school. In Writing and Language 9A, students explore and develop their voices as writers. Approaching literature as apprentice writers, they examine models such as short stories, essays, and novels to explore the choices writers make and the effects arising from those choices. They learn to emulate those effects in their own work and practice reflection, revision, and rewriting. In Literature and Language 9B, students hone their critical reading skills by studying texts closely. Through careful reading and analysis, students learn to consider diverse interpretations of experience that arise out of a wide variety of perspectives.

1 Credit

English 2

Between Writers and Readers: Giving Voice to Ideas focuses on specific genres to help students understand how authors' perceptions of the world drive them to convey their understanding of the human experience. The course includes four units: Stories of the Individual-Memoir and Coming-of-Age Stories; Stories in the Oral Tradition-Drama and Epic Poetry; Stories in the World-Historical and Political Literature; and Stories of Other Worlds-Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Imaginative Literature. Students compose in different modes for different purposes, with opportunities to practice composing in the genres they study.

1 Credit

English 3

Inquiry into the American Experience encourages both teacher and student autonomy in order to provide for the kind of creative, authentic, and deep teaching and learning necessary to prepare all students for college and careers. The word inquiry in the course title emphasizes the search to make meaning, and the subject of that inquiry is the multitude of different ways that individuals experience life in this country. Teachers develop units based on broad themes and open-ended questions, engaging students with complex texts, ideas, and writing assignments. Throughout the course, teachers also encourage students to choose texts from diverse perspectives and time periods, research issues that interest them, and present their ideas in a variety of analytical and creative formats

1 Credit

English 4

Inquiry into the Global Experience encourages students to consider multiple and complex points of view on universal themes and global issues. Students pursue questions that interest them and read a variety of texts that are diverse in terms of cultural experience, time period, and world view, including text from  non-Eurocentric perspectives. The word "inquiry" in the course title emphasizes the search to make meaning and to grapple with the big ideas and challenging issues of our increasingly global society. In preparation for college and careers, students continue to develop skills for using language to understand a world that is changing rapidly in terms of how information is produced and shared.

1 Credit

Spanish 1

Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret basic information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and basic grammatical structures are taught within the context of these familiar topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

1 Credit

Spanish 2

Students expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

1 Credit

French 1

Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret basic information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and basic grammatical structures are taught within the context of these familiar topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

1 Credit

French 2

Students expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

1 Credit

Mandarin 1

Students begin to learn to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret basic information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and basic grammatical structures are taught within the context of these familiar topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

1 Credit

Mandarin 2

Students expand their ability to communicate orally and in writing in a culturally appropriate manner about topics related to daily life. They interpret information when listening and reading. Vocabulary and grammatical structures are taught within the context of these topics. Culture is embedded throughout the course.

1 Credit

Global Issues

This course addresses contemporary issues impacting international and global affairs in terms of the major political, social, economic and environmental forces confronting global communities. Themes include democracy and human rights, nationalism and conditions of conflict and stability, economic globalization, resource distribution and depletion, responsibilities of international and transnational organizations, technological development and environmental concerns, cultural diversity and identity, and the possibility of global stability and future world order.

.5 Credit

International Business

This course provides an introduction to international business. Topics include: 1) the effects on international business decisions of cultural, political, legal, and economic forces; 2) a presentation of international business basics such as trade, tariffs, exchange rate regimes, capital markets; 3) a study of the comparative theoretical frameworks for establishing international business enterprises, including trade and investment theory; 4) effects of government intervention and aid.

.5 Credit

Intro to Sociology

Sociology is concerned with human groups and factors that unite or divide them, including culture, values, social groups, social stratification, population, the family, socialization, propaganda, and social institutions. Focus is on the impact of change on mores, norms, and customs. Emphasis is placed on the application of the basic concepts of social change to American institutions, particularly education and the family. Research papers focus on community or on-site research.

.5 Credit

Cultural Studies

An examination of selected cultural studies will cover cultural studies philosophies, theories, and/or approaches to the study of cultural artifacts and practices that may include some of the following: postmodernism, deconstruction, feminism, and post-colonialism, privileging context as a means of understanding culture.

.5 Credit

Art Courses

Visual Arts

Students will be engaged in discussion about the elements of art such as content, composition, style, method and materials. Students will also be introduced to all of the visual art practices, including drawing and painting, photography, conceptual and installation art, video art, performance art, and craft and graphic design.

.5 Credit

Media and Communications

Students will explore communication in a variety of contexts, including intrapersonal, organizational, intercultural, and mass communication. In addition, the effects of mass media will be explored through books, magazines, newspapers and electronic media like radio, television, film, sound recordings, and the Internet.

.5 Credit

Broadcasting and Video Production

Students engage in planning and script development, lighting, set design and construction, camera operation, sound mixing, technical directing, content editing, graphics generation, and equipment training to support studio and remote production.

.5 Credit

Intro to Photography

Introduction to photographic techniques. Topics include basic principles of composition, image manipulation softwares, exposure, camera controls, digital printing and file management. Students will explore creative possibilities and thematic modes of photography.

.5 Credit

Graphic Design

Introduction to graphics on the computer. Students will explore hardware and software that relate to the presentation of graphic design projects and computer generated imaging.

.5 Credit

Journalism

Students develop skills in gathering and reporting news, editing, copyreading, and headlining. Students also consider issues such as the responsibilities of the press, libel and slander laws, problems of censorship, and the role of the news media in shaping public opinion.

.5 Credit

Web Page Design

Introduction to planning and designing effective web pages; implementing web pages by writing HTML and CSS code; enhancing web pages with the use of page layout techniques, text formatting, graphics, images, and multimedia; and producing a functional, multi-page website.

.5 Credit

 
 
 
 
 
 
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Contact Us

Telephone

301-570-0999

Email

info@echelonacademy.org

Address

4032 Blackburn Lane

Burtonsville, MD 20866

© Copyright 2019 by The Echelon Academy

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY AS TO STUDENTS

Echelon admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school.  It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.